Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Kelli Talks Horror Movies for Halloween!




Hi everyone!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

In honor of the Halloween holiday (it's my personal favorite and yes, those are my “vintage” 1970s decorations above), I’m sharing a bit about my favorite horror movies. 

Although this is off my usual topic of writing, writing and movies are connected – after all, every movie begins with a story idea. And, as some people may know, I majored in film studies in college.  So I’ve been watching movies and writing about them forever.

Horror movies (like ice cream) come in a variety of flavors, and horror movie fans/buffs have their personal likes and dislikes. Some people are devoted to the classic 1930 and 1940 Universal Studios “monster” films starring Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff. Others enjoy the British Hammer and American International films of the 1960s and 1970s. Those are famous for featuring Peter Cushing, Vincent Price, and Christopher Lee.

Some fans are attracted to a specific genre (torture porn, mutant hillbilly families, camping, killer clowns) or a particular type of monster (vampires, werewolves, zombies). Still other folks are loyal to a specific character (Jason Voorhees) or a franchise (Halloween, A Nightmare on Elm St., SAW)

At this time of year, you can find almost any kind of horror movie or monster on TV or available for screaming... I mean, streaming. Horror movie fans can practically glue themselves to the couch and catch all day marathons of their favorite movies on about 1000 channels. (I actually did that yesterday!)

I could go on and on (really!) about what makes a good (scary) horror movie, but here’s a list of my favorites (in alphabetical order – with 2 ties.). They’re not all necessarily gory or scary, but they have a good story, tense camera work, or are just plain cool.

The Amityville Horror (1975) – Some houses are cheap for a reason! Skip the sequels & remakes.

Dog Soldiers (2002) – Best werewolf movie ever.

Dracula (1931) tied with The Mummy (1932) – Can’t choose between them!

Evil Dead (1983) – Bruce Campbell stays in the worst cabin ever – yey!

Halloween (1978) tied with Black Christmas (1974) – Both are classics that freaked people out – and are strikingly similar (watch them back to back!).

King Kong (1933) – A classic for its time – the island part is the best.

The Other (1972) – Often overlooked story about creepy twins – need I say more?

Pitch Black (2000) – Life on other planets isn’t always nice.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) – Paranoia and persecution = Polanski.

And, in my personal favorite genre, 1970s horror movies, here are the top ten. Some are considered classic or revolutionary and others are just plain bad. (The “so bad they’re good” kind!)

Bad Ronald (1974) – Who’s living behind your walls?

Black Christmas (1974) – Yes, this makes BOTH lists. It’s the first really creepy Christmas movie and a true classic!

The Car (1977) – Before Christine started trouble, this scared everyone.

Dark Night of the Scarecrow – Okay, it’s really 1981, but who won’t jump at the last scene in this TV movie?

Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (1973) – When someone tells you not to open something, don’t!

Frogs (1972) – One of my favorites – original poster had a hand hanging out of the frog’s mouth.

The Hills Have Eyes (1977) – A family goes camping and meets another, stranger, family.

Race with the Devil (1975) – Again, while trying to go camping, a group meets up with 
trouble (anti-camping movies are their own genre!)

Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) – The horror classic about a dysfunctional family – and there’s no blood – really! (RIP, Gunnar.)

Twisted Brain (1974) – Horror in high school (makes a great double feature with Bad Ronald).

So there you have it, my take on horror movies. What are yours? What do you think of these? Check a few out and enjoy them – at your own risk, of course!

And while we’re talking movies… what’s my ALL-TIME FAVORITE movie with the word “horror” in the title? It’s not a horror movie... it’s… THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW.

And what horror/Halloween music do I listen to? Two recommendations: Book of Love’s CD Book of Love. The whole thing is great, but download the song “Witchcraft” to get an idea. And, anything by Midnight Syndicate.



Have a happy Halloween everyone! And a blessed New Year to all who are celebrating!

Kelli

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Kelli’s Quill - Haunted October 2017 Issue



Hi everyone! It's the most wonderful time of the year again (at least for me!). I'm celebrating all things Halloween with a look at my paranormal romances & giving out a few treats. 

New Paranormal Romance Release

My paranormal comedy, Beauty & the Bigfoot, was released in late September. It's an unusual look at the legend of Bigfoot and blends the paranormal with humor, drama, and spicy love scenes. (If you think you know how it ends, think again!)

Beauty & the Bigfoot
Can true love exist between the species?

Tara’s world is anything but normal. Her father is known as the resident crackpot – just because he’s on a personal mission to catch a Sasquatch. Despite all of the “Bigfoot evidence” cluttering their house, Tara never really believed in Bigfoot – until the day her father brought him home.

She affectionately names her father’s prized catch ‘Joe’ and discovers there’s something oddly familiar – and erotic – about him. With a media circus descending on her father’s ranch and a showdown brewing with the local sheriff, Tara risks her life to save Joe.
When Tara finally succumbs to her animalistic urges, she learns that Joe is not exactly who – or what – he seems. Joe is more than a Sasquatch – he’s her soul mate!

Order Beauty & the Bigfoot here:



More Paranormal Romances

Don’t miss Kelli’s other paranormal romances, Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover, The Viking’s Witch, and Killer in Wolf’s Clothing. Here are the book summaries & links:

Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover is a different type of romance. For starters, the novella is told in the first person from the hero’s point of view. The story also makes use of a setting where you don’t normally find vampires—the beach! 

Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover

The moment Brian spotted Anya sitting on the moonlit beach, he was hooked. Beautiful, smart, and sexy, Anya was the girl of his dreams. She didn’t mind that he spent the hot summer days riding the ocean waves, because once the sun set, he belonged to her—all night long!

Everything is perfect between them—until Brian discovers Anya’s shocking secret. Can Brian give up the sun, sand, and surf to be with the woman he loves?

Read Brian’s first-hand account of their unusual love story in… Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover.



Order your copy here:

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/confessions-of-a-vampires-lover-kelli-a-wilkins/1017484568  

Killer in Wolf’s Clothing is a fun look at the werewolf legend and blends mystery, danger, humor, and sizzling love scenes. 

Killer in Wolf’s Clothing
A super aggressive Alpha male, a serial killer, and a visit to a kinky sex club… What has Larry gotten himself into?

When Larry learns that his boyfriend Greg changes into another man during the full moon, he has a hard time accepting it—until he meets Deke, Greg’s alternate Alpha personality.

Deke doesn’t play nice and has no time for games. He only wants two things—to get laid and to get revenge against the arsonist who murdered his friends. Finally free from Greg’s restraints, Deke is ready for action, and Larry is more than willing to submit to Deke’s needs.

Together, Larry and Deke set out to find the killer. Their hunt takes them to an all-night Alpha sex club where things heat up for the two of them. But when Larry unwittingly falls into the clutches of the murderer, it’s up to Deke—and Greg—to save him before it’s too late. 

Order Killer in Wolf’s Clothing here:


Set in Scotland, The Viking’s Witch is a great blend of spicy romance and paranormal elements. It has received excellent reviews and won a Gold IPPY award.

The Viking’s Witch

About to be burned at the stake by her fellow villagers, Odaria does what any betrayed witch facing certain death would do. She calls down a curse. Within seconds, rampaging Norsemen raid the village, capturing everyone except her.

But her reprieve is short-lived, and Odaria lands in the clutches of the Norse leader Rothgar. Can she remain true to herself and fight her growing attraction to this domineering man, or will she fall under his influence and be used for his ambitions?

After Rothgar witnesses Odaria’s powers firsthand, he strikes a bargain with her. The raven-haired beauty will use her magical abilities to help him with his quest in exchange for safe passage off the isle. But can this cunning woman be trusted, or is she using him to exact vengeance on her village?

Together they must fight bloodthirsty villagers, battle a mutinous band of Norsemen, find a missing Norse ship, and learn to trust each other . . . before time is up.

Order The Viking’s Witch Here:




Are you ready to be scared? Don’t miss Kelli’s horror stories, Dead Til Dawn and Kropsy’s Curse

Dead ‘Til Dawn

Disturbing the dead doesn’t prove you’re brave – it proves you’re stupid.

After touring Gettysburg battlefield, Jessica, Tim, and Steve decide to sneak out to the Devil’s Den for some late-night fun. Jessica’s friend Kathy objects, and warns them about trespassing where they’re not wanted.

Undaunted by ghost stories and fueled by his own arrogance, Tim races toward the Devil’s Den. When the group drives through mysterious battlefield fog, they find themselves surrounded by Civil War soldiers looking for a little fun of their own.

Kathy leaves the others to fend for themselves and flees to Little Round Top. Although she’s rescued by a kindhearted Union solider named Charlie, she refuses to believe that what she’s experiencing is real. As the nighttime battle rages on, Charlie introduces Kathy to other weary soldiers, and she quickly realizes she’s trapped in the land of the dead until dawn.
Order your copy from:


Beware of Kropsy’s Curse!

Late one Halloween night, two young boys venture into a secluded graveyard in the hopes of conjuring up a spirit. Although Kyle is skeptical and would rather be home eating candy and watching horror movies, he reluctantly goes along with Jerry’s plan. He doesn’t believe Ouija boards work—until this one starts spelling out a message…

This Halloween-themed 1500 word short story is a cautionary tale about playing with a Ouija board in a graveyard.

Available from:



MORE HORRORS!



Kelli’s short horror fiction has appeared in several anthologies. Visit her Amazon author page www.amazon.com/author/kelliwilkins or site www.KelliWilkins.com to see all her terrifying tales.

A Few Treats! Guest Blogs & More…

Read about the making of Beauty & the Bigfoot. Post includes a fun excerpt! https://celticladysreviews.blogspot.com/2017/09/beauty-bigfoot-by-kelli-awilkins.html


Kelli discusses creating secondary characters that shine! http://beverleybateman.blogspot.ca/2017/09/kelli-wilkins-talks-about-secondary.html

Guest Author Day with Kelli A. Wilkins - Kelli discusses creating a Rough Road to a HEA! https://dawnsreadingnook.blogspot.com/2017/09/guest-author-day-with-kelli-wilkins.html

Read about the making of Kelli’s spicy contemporary romance, Trust with Hearts: http://anastasiapollack.blogspot.com/2017/09/book-club-friday-guest-author-kelli.html

Two great reviews for Kelli’s historical romance, LOVING A WILD STRANGER. Post includes links to excerpts & more: http://kelliwilkinsauthor.blogspot.com/2017/08/reviewers-love-loving-wild-stranger.html


Kelli’s Corner
This month I’m sharing a treat! Here’s an excerpt from my interview with Patrick C. Greene, as we discuss writing horror and more…

Hi Kelli! Thank you for joining me today. Let’s kick off this interview with the most important question. Have you ever encountered a ghost?

Yes, I’ve had plenty of supernatural or paranormal encounters with spirits. My husband and I like to explore creepy old places (historical houses, castles, battlefields, etc.), whether or not they’re reputed to be haunted. Sometimes we come across spirits, sometimes not. Our travels have taken us all over: the UK, Gettysburg, Alcatraz, Eastern State Prison, local historical sites, and hundreds more I can’t even remember.

Sometimes we get a “feel” that there’s someone around and other times we’ve heard things that have no rational explanation such as voices, footsteps, and we’ve even seen a few apparitions. There are too many to go into details on all of them, but I wrote about seeing my husband’s deceased dog in the anthology Departed Pets. When I first saw the dog standing in front of me, I didn’t think much of it. He looked like he always did. Then a minute later I remembered that the dog had been dead for a few weeks.

These things don’t scare me or freak me out. I think they’re interesting. A lot of people have ghost stories, but most of them are reluctant to open up about what they’ve experienced.

What’s the most shocking book or story you’ve ever read?
I’ve read a lot of things that have stuck with me for one reason or another. The first horror story I ever remember scaring me (and still sticks with me) is “Wendigo’s Child” by Thomas F. Monteleone. It was in an anthology for children called Monster Tales: Vampires, Werewolves, & Things. I read it when I was in grade school. Anyone who has read it understands the last line. “It was looking up at him.”

Read the rest of the interview here:

Want more? Read another horror-themed interview here: https://www.killionslade.com/author-interview-kelli-wilkins-thursday-night-bingo/

I hope you enjoyed this issue of the Quill. Please share it with your social media friends. I welcome feedback and questions from readers, so drop me a line with your comments. 

Happy Haunting!

Kelli

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Writing Horror Fiction 101



Hi everyone,

It’s October, and my favorite time of year! It’s the perfect season to read, write, and think about horror stories…

As most people know, I divide my time between writing horror and romance. When it comes to horror, I’m always asked a lot of questions: How does a person write a horror story? What makes a great one? How can you make a convincing story about a monster if monsters aren’t real?

I answered all of these questions in my non-fiction writing guide, You Can Write—Really! A Beginner’s Guide to Writing Fiction. Here’s an excerpt from the section on writing horror:

First, it’s important to realize that horror can take many forms – gore-filled splatter-punk with buckets of blood… mysterious, cursed people living in isolated Gothic castles (or tropical islands)… psychological unsettling horror that makes you feel uneasy… or your ordinary “classic” monsters such as vampires, ghosts, zombies, and werewolves.

My horror stories tend to be based in psychological terrors rather than blood and gore. They’re set in a wide range of seasons and settings, and my characters run the gamut from small children (The Ape) to mentally fragile suburban housewives (Sometimes Monsters are Real).

Each kind of horror story has its fans, probably because different people are scared of different things (heights, monkeys, bridges, etc.). But whatever type of horror story you write (or read) there are a few universal elements that should go into any horror tale.

Horror readers want to be scared (or at least made to feel nervous), so start scaring people on page one. Use a clever hook, details, and setting to pull readers in. Start with a pool of blood on the floor or give us all the details of your haunted house. Let readers experience what it feels like to be chased across a field by a werewolf.

In horror, you can write almost anything and get away with it. Play on childhood fears and things people hate (or are afraid of). Here’s a short list: cats, clowns, creepy dolls, being buried alive, stuffed moose heads, basements, closets, the dark…

While you’re writing, keep the tension and suspense constant. Enhance anticipation and fear in layers. Your novel or short story needs twists and turns to keep the reader engaged and wondering, “What happens next?” Be sure to end scenes (and/or chapters) with a cliffhanger or another danger.

As with any story, the author has to establish a believable setting. Whether your tale takes place in a gritty, post-apocalyptic city or a foggy rural graveyard, you need to give your readers a concrete foundation of where the story is taking place.

Readers want to feel as if they are there, experiencing the events along with the main characters. Use lots of details (sights, smells, sounds) and props to make your descriptions come alive. My story, Kropsy’s Curse makes great use of setting. What’s better than a horror story set in a graveyard on Halloween?

Remember, your job as a writer is to get readers to suspend their (dis)belief and buy into your story. You don’t have to go into a lengthy explanation of how these strange things are possible, just give your readers a compelling reason, have your characters believe it, and move on. In my novella, Dead Til Dawn, the heroine finds herself transported back in time after walking through a mysterious fog. She doesn’t understand how or why it’s possible, but she’s forced to accept it… if she wants to survive.

If your antagonist is a monster (of the non-human variety) you must believe your monster is real (whether he’s a vampire, a werewolf, or a slimy sewer creature). If you don’t write the creature believably, readers won’t buy into it. Make your monster as real as any other human character and show him in action.

And because your monster is not human, it’s okay for readers to hate him. They should know he’s bad news from the start of the story, so make him awful. You don’t want readers (or other characters) sympathizing with your monster — you want them to fear him.

If your monster is human (serial killer), depict him at his worst. Don’t shy away from showing him doing really bad, socially unacceptable things. Horror stories are generally dark and explore themes and ideas that expose the bad side of people. If you’re not comfortable going to “the dark side” to write terrifying stuff, you may want to consider writing thrillers or suspense stories.

Your human “monster” needs to be fleshed out. Develop his character through details, give him a history, and show why he’s so warped. If your villain is a racist, show readers how nasty he is through his actions, dialogue, or vocabulary. Make readers hate him. Get readers emotionally involved so they can’t wait for him to get what he deserves in the end. (And he will!)

When creating a human monster, take cues from reality. Most predators are cunning, manipulative, without remorse or conscience, and have a sense of entitlement. They’re great at tricking people and identifying weak spots or vulnerabilities. They are practiced liars and good at covering their tracks to avoid detection. In general, people underestimate them. Many serial killers blend into society and nobody suspects a thing—now isn’t that scary?

And try to avoid clichés like the plague! Masked killers hunting campers in the woods, serial-killing cannibal families, miserable Goth vampires in period costume, and mindless zombie attacks have all been done to… well, death. And please don’t mix monsters. Only include one primary menace/monster in your story. Don’t have vampires, werewolves, zombies, and demons attacking a cursed town during a full moon on Halloween. It’s overkill – and not in a good way.

When writing horror, don’t be afraid to break patterns, make your characters different, or have them go against stereotype. Give readers something unexpected, turn a cliché on its ear, or use a different point of view – it’ll make your work stand out. Why not set your werewolf story in Hawaii? My paranormal romance, Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover, takes place where you normally don’t find vampires... the beach!

We all know that October is “horror month” because of Halloween, but there are plenty of spooky things going on the rest of the year. Loyal readers and writers of horror fiction know that a good horror story is just as scary on a warm June day as it is at midnight on Halloween. Remember, JAWS took place in the summer, and a haunted house can be terrifying on a rainy March afternoon…

Remember, when writing horror, the only limit is your imagination!

Here are two writing exercises to motivate you to write a horror story of your own. How will you scare people?

EXERCISE 1: Take one of these first lines and write a few paragraphs about it. See what ideas come to you as you start writing.

Steve knew his house was haunted, but that didn’t bother him. He had bigger problems.

On a warm June day, the body of Ann Marie Duncan washed up on shore.

Mike got a strange call from Dave on Friday. After that, he never heard from him again.


EXERCISE 2: Here are some wild “what if” questions to get you thinking about story ideas. Pick a few and write three to five paragraphs about each. What if…

…your character inherited a haunted house and knew the ghosts?

…a killer picks his victims according to their birth sign?

…the weird Goth kid down the block really is a vampire?

…a woman finds a blood-soaked clown hiding in her garage?

Ready to write? Order your copy of You Can Write—Really! here:















Next week I'll be sharing a look at my favorite horror movies! Stay tuned to be scared!

Happy Haunting,

Kelli

Thursday, October 12, 2017

When Love Meets Monsters – Paranormal Romance!






Hi Everyone,

October is my favorite month, and I’m writing about what happens when horror meets romance –paranormal romance!

Although I create hot and spicy romances, I actually started out writing horror stories. For some, that might seem like an odd combination, but it works for me. One half of my brain writes the horror, and the other half writes the romance.

I like writing horror fiction because I get to explore different settings, plots, and characters that I couldn’t develop in romance. Sometimes after working on several romances, I’ll switch moods and write a horror story to give my writing muscles a change of pace.

My horror short stories are more psychological/spooky than gory, and it’s fun to add something scary (or strange!) to a romance. Sometimes it’s hard to keep a paranormal romance within bounds – you have to blend just enough horror elements into the love story without grossing out (or turning off) the heroine or hero… or readers!

Other times, the challenge to writing a good paranormal romance is creating a believable plot or finding a way to make a “monster” attractive, romantic, or sexy. If one of your characters is a monster (of the non-human variety) you must believe your creature is real, whether he’s a vampire, a werewolf, or something else entirely.

If you don’t write the creature believably, readers won’t buy into it, and there certainly won’t be any sparks flying in your romance. As a writer, you need to make your monster as real as any other human character and flesh him out completely with a backstory, goals, motivation, and conflicts. (What kind of monster is he? How did he get that way? What is life like for him?)

My contemporary paranormal, Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover started out with the premise “What if a vampire went to the beach and fell in love with a surfer?” The book is extra “unique” in that it’s told in first person from the male character’s point of view.

I made Anya (the vampire) sympathetic and sexy, and not overtly terrifyingyet she still flexed her vampire muscles when she needed to. This story could have easily gone down the horror road and become a full-fledged vampire story, but I wanted to show a softer, kinder side to the Anya and embrace her once-human side.

My gay paranormal, Killer in Wolf’s Clothing is not your usual werewolf love story. Readers should know that Deke, the “werewolf” character, doesn’t actually turn into a “wolf-man” – he’s more of a shifter who transforms into a super-aggressive Alpha male during the full moon. As I say in the book, “It’s more Incredible Hulk than American Werewolf in London.”

I almost had a problem writing Killer in Wolf’s Clothing because I’m “old-school” when it comes to creatures of the night. I expect my werewolves to be violent and vicious, and anything but cuddly. In my opinion, if a person is going to turn into a werewolf/wolf-man, he should look like the werewolves in Dog Soldiers. (A horror movie I highly recommend.)

My latest paranormal, Beauty & the Bigfoot (yes, you read that right!) blends the world of paranormal romance with comedy. (Because, really, how can you not?) From page one, the book doesn’t take itself seriously, and neither should readers. It’s called a paranormal comedy for a reason.

Beauty & the Bigfoot started out with the premise: “What if a cryptozoologist’s daughter fell in love with a captured Bigfoot?” I liked the idea, but I wasn’t sure where I could take it.

When I created the character of Bigfoot/Joe, I had to make sure he wasn’t too scary or too intimidating to Tara, the heroine. To her, he looked like a really hairy guy. She initially blames her attraction to him “on hormones or pheromones or the fact that she really needs a date” but later realizes that Joe is her soulmate. I humanized Joe in several scenes, letting readers see that he’s really not at all the monster everyone thinks he is – without giving too much away.

The book was a lot of fun to write and I had a great time creating the characters. Through Tara and her eccentric father, Charlie, I was able to turn up the camp level and add in many wacky references and asides.

The Viking’s Witch is a historical romance with paranormal elements set in Scotland. The heroine, Odaria, is what they called a witch back then – nowadays we’d call her a psychic and a healer. Odaria’s “magic” is the catalyst that sets the story in motion. When the book opens, Odaria is about to be burned alive for being a witch. She calls down a spell and curses the villagers while unknowingly invoking a Viking raid. Or so it seems…

Odaria uses her abilities for self-preservation and to get revenge on the people who hurt her. Rothgar (the hero) doesn’t believe in her magic and thinks she’s merely pretending to be a witch to frighten people. But after a highly-charged interaction with Brennan (the villain), Rothgar gets a taste of what Odaria could really do if she set her mind to it.

I loved showing readers (and Rothgar) Odaria’s powers of clairvoyance, telekinesis, and psychometry. The scenes that included the “magic” elements were a lot of fun to write. I’ve always been interested in psychic phenomena and other New Age/paranormal subjects, so it was easy for me to incorporate what I know into Odaria’s character.

Vampires, shapeshifters, witches… no matter what subgenre of paranormal romance you write, readers need to be swept into the story and buy into the premise that you’ve created. Your job as a writer is to make the reader believe in the paranormal character and take the reader on a journey with the main characters as they fall in love. The situations in the story need to be plausible and told in a way that grips the reader, even if the premise seems a bit far-fetched (at first).

When writing paranormal romance, don’t be afraid to break patterns, make your characters different, or have them go against stereotype. Give readers something unexpected, turn a cliché on its ear, or use a different point of view – it’ll make your work stand out. 

Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover takes place at the beach – and that’s not a place you expect to find a vampire.


Here are the book summaries and links to Beauty & the Bigfoot and Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover.

Beauty & the Bigfoot
Can true love exist between the species?

Tara’s world is anything but normal. Her father is known as the resident crackpot – just because he’s on a personal mission to catch a Sasquatch. Despite all of the “Bigfoot evidence” cluttering their house, Tara never really believed in Bigfoot – until the day her father brought him home.

She affectionately names her father’s prized catch ‘Joe’ and discovers there’s something oddly familiar – and erotic – about him. With a media circus descending on her father’s ranch and a showdown brewing with the local sheriff, Tara risks her life to save Joe. 

When Tara finally succumbs to her animalistic urges, she learns that Joe is not exactly who – or what – he seems. Joe is more than a Sasquatch – he’s her soul mate!

Order your copy of Beauty & the Bigfoot here:




Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover

The moment Brian spotted Anya sitting on the moonlit beach, he was hooked. Beautiful, smart, and sexy, Anya was the girl of his dreams. She didn’t mind that he spent the hot summer days riding the ocean waves, because once the sun set, he belonged to her—all night long!

Everything is perfect between them—until Brian discovers Anya’s shocking secret. Can Brian give up the sun, sand, and surf to be with the woman he loves?

Read Brian’s first-hand account of their unusual love story in… Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover.



Order your copy of Confessions of a Vampire’s Lover here:



I hope you’ve enjoyed this look at paranormal romances. I welcome comments and questions from readers and other authors. Feel free to contact me via the email address on the News page of my site or on social media. 

Happy Haunting!

Kelli